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Video Part 2- Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family & Friends of Transgender People

by Trans-Kin on 07/14/15

Streamed live on Apr 19, 2015
 

When one member transitions, the whole family transitions!



How do we both give and receive support?


Eleanor Hubbard, co-editor of Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family and Friends of Transgender People, and Kathe Perez will chat about the  SOFFA (significant other, family, friends, and allies) experience with their transgender loved one.


Dr. Hubbard and Annika Kappenstein joined me for an interactive webinar on Sunday, April 19, 2015 at 7:00 pm MDT.


Eleanor Hubbard received her Ph.D., from the University of Colorado at Boulder in Sociology, specializing in studies of gender, sexual orientation.  Dr. Hubbard is married to Dennis Hubbard and is a devoted ally to the transgender community.


Annika Kappenstein, MFA, in a graphic artist, website designer and co-creator and co-founder of Eva, the world's first voice-training mobile app for transgender people. She is based in Atlanta, GA.

www.trans-kin.com

www.exceptionalvoice.com

www.annikappenstein.com


Kathe Perez
info@exceptionalvoice.com
866.4.my.voice

Video Part 1 Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family & Friends of Transgender People

by Trans-Kin on 07/14/15

Streamed live on Mar 8, 2015

Eleanor Hubbard, co-editor of Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family and Friends of Transgender People, will discuss the stages that SOFFAs encounter as they transition in similar and different ways than their transgender loved ones. In this educational and experiential webinar, she will tell many stories of how the loved ones of trans* people have survived and thrived as they go through their own transition stages.



Eleanor will skillfully illustrate the ways that SOFFAs can be successful in not only more fully loving their trans* person, but also in the process deal with their own gender issues.



Short Bio: Eleanor Hubbard received her Ph.D., from the University of Colorado at Boulder in Sociology, specializing in studies of gender, sexual orientation. Dr. Hubbard is married to Dennis Hubbard and is a devoted ally to the transgender community.


Short Bio: Kathe Perez is a certified speech-language pathologist (University of Colorado-Boulder) and leading provider of trans* voice training for transgender people. She is the co-founcer and co-creator of Eva, the world's first voice training mobile app for transgender people.


www.exceptionalvoice.com
866.4.my.voice

Bradley Manning Coming Out as Trans

by Trans-Kin on 10/07/13

Chelsea Elizabeth Manning (aka Bradley) is a US soldier recently convicted of releasing secret documents and sentenced to 35 years in prison. Before going to prison, Bradley (as he was known during the trial) came out as transgender asking that he be called Chelsea, treated as a woman while in prison, and receive hormones and sex reassignment surgery. 

As an ally of the transgender community and co-editor of Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family and Friends of Transgender People, I am frequently asked whether Chelsea's coming out was a good thing or a bad thing for the transgender community. I have struggled with this question myself; here are my preliminary thoughts that I hope will spark more conversation among significant others, family members, friends and allies (SOFFAs), as well as trans people themselves.

I would say, first, that when anyone chooses to come out as transgender it is rarely the "right" time. SOFFA might ask the trans person to wait until they are no longer married, or when Grandpa dies, or when the school system is ready to receive their trans youth.  Transitioning, in my opinion, is a very personal decision, while still impacted by their social network. So it might have been better for Chelsea to have begun her transition sooner or later, but she made the decision that was best for her.

Given that, we can assess what Chelsea's coming out so publicly means for the entire transgender community.

It is not too surprising that male-to-female (M2F) transgender people go into the military, in order to (they hope) suppress their femaleness.  Recently in an interview with Anderson Cooper, a Navy SEAL, Kristin (Chris) Beck, revealed that she was born in the wrong body. Chris, as others presumably do, joined the military in  order to eliminate his transgender nature. Chris' comrades said that he always volunteered for the most dangerous assignments and was always successful.  However, he was unable to deny his femaleness, so shortly after leaving the SEALs, Kristin transitioned and wrote a book about her experiences, entitled Warrior Princess: A U.S. Navy SEAL's Journey to Coming Out Transgender.  

We, as members of the transgender community, can understand and honor Chelsea's decision to be a soldier. We will probably disagree, however, about whether she should have released the largest disclosure of state secrets in US history, but we can agree that mostly that decision has been denigrated by the military, by her government, and most of the American public. I think that this disparagement will color the attitudes of the larger society toward transgender people in general and make the assumption that her transgender status somehow affected her decision to release the documents. In this sense, I am sorry that an opportunity for consciousness raising has become derailed.

 

FAQ: Somewhere I heard that there are trans people in other cultures. Is this true?

by Trans-Kin on 02/13/13

Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family and Friends of Transgender People has Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

 

Maybe you have thought about this question; we invite you to respond:

 

Q: Somewhere I heard that there are trans people in other cultures. Is this true?

 

A: Absolutely. There have been people who transgress and transcend gender in every society and in every historical time. In our early history and in many places still today, trans people are shamans or considered holy members of their communities. In India, for example, hijras are usually physiologically male, but with feminine attributes. Culturally, they are often considered to be a third sex. Check out the reading list for books that will give you more information.

 

Or post your own question; we will answer any question!

FAQ: My friend just told me she is trans. I am angry, confused and I just do not get it. How can she not be the person she was born to be?

by Trans-Kin on 01/06/13

Trans-Kin: A Guide for Family and Friends of Transgender People has Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

 

Maybe you have thought about this question; we invite you to respond:

 

Q: My friend just told me she is trans. I am angry, confused and I just do not get it. How can she not be the person she was born to be?

 

A: Gender identity is about feelings not genitals. Even if you understand this, though, you will still probably have very mixed feelings, many of them negative, about what your friend told you. Remember even though she feels differently about her gender than you do, she really is the same person you love. Try to talk honestly with each other and explore what is the same in your relationship and what is different.

 

Or post your own question; we will answer any question!

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